Cameras and cars on committee's wish list

By Matthew Bernat | Oct 13, 2016

Break-ins, a truck fire and a fuel line leak prompted members of the Capital Planning Committee to include funds for new items in the town’s FY17 Capital Plan, which will be voted on at this month’s Town Meeting.

Meeting on Oct. 13, the committee approved requests for $175,000 to replace a bucket truck totaled in a fire at Municipal Maintenance in September, $75,000 for surveillance cameras and other technology, as well as $25,000 for three electric cars and two charging stations.

A total amount for the Capital Plan as not yet been finalized.

Town Administrator Derek Sullivan said the bucket truck was a key piece of equipment that had to be replaced following the fire.

Built in 1989, Sullivan said the truck was, “something we used nonstop, from putting up flags and banners on Main Street to trimming trees – that one was used a whole lot. It’s a big loss for us”

Sullivan said insurance coverage will cover some of the replacement cost. Officials will start looking for a replacement, either new or used.

“It depends on the best deal we can get,” said Sullivan.

Information Technology Director Matthew Underhill said the fire at Municipal Maintenance highlighted the need for surveillance cameras. Underhill brought forth the proposal earlier this year. After the fire and a spate of break-ins of employee cars parked in at Wareham EMS headquarters, he said the need for cameras was evident.

Also, with the school bus fleet now under the direction of Municipal Maintenance, people are coming and going from the building after hours, he said. With the installation of fuel pumps at the building, cameras would add an extra layer of security and hopefully discourage employees from filling up personal vehicles when no one is around.

“If there are any abnormal charges there will be video to look at,” said Underhill.

The funds will also be used to replace security cameras at the Wareaham Free Library. Underhill noted security cameras had been installed at the library, but were turned off 10 years ago. They no longer work, he said.

Switching gears to transportation, Sullivan said when it comes to how town employees get around officials are seeking funds to lease three electrical cars and buy two charging stations.

Federal programs have incentivized cities and towns to purchase or lease the cars through rebates. Currently, employees who are not working for Municipal Maintenance use old police cruisers for town business. A fuel leak in one of those cars resulted in a $2,500 repair bill recently.

“There are more economical ways to get around then retired police cruisers,” said Sullivan.

The plan is to lease the electrical vehicles for three years. Rebates would cover a significant portion of the cost, said Sullivan. Up to $7,500 is available for electric vehicles and $2,500 for hybrid vehicles.

The charging stations will be located at Town Hall. Looking ahead, Sullivan floated the idea of installing another charging station at the Cranberry Region Visitors’ Center located on I-195 in Wareham.

Doing so would hopefully entice drivers of electric cars to stop and charge up before heading towards the Cape.

“It’s another way for us to sell the town,” said Sullivan.

Town Meeting is scheduled for Oct. 24 starting at 7 p.m. in the Wareham High School auditorium.

Comments (14)
Posted by: Society for Suppression of Noise | Oct 13, 2016 22:00

Oh, hell, yes on the electric cars.  But if the town is going to invest in a charging station it should be in a more Warehamy location--downtown perhaps, where there is an excess of parking--instead of a rest stop on I-195.



Posted by: bob | Oct 14, 2016 05:39

Society,you got that right,why should our tax monies be put out on a state highway,let the state install a charging station if they think its a good place to install one...



Posted by: Wareham By The Sea | Oct 14, 2016 05:58

"A fuel leak in one of those cars resulted in a $2,500 repair bill recently." Really!  2500 to fix a fuel leak in an old car.  Someone made out in that deal.  From the tank to the engine, there is nothing in the fuel system that would ever cost that much to fix.  We got robbed!  Who did the work?



Posted by: Wareham By The Sea | Oct 14, 2016 06:20

Society, I agree.  That rest stop wouldn't be a good place for our charging station. However, I wouldn't suggest a Warehamy location.  That means putting a charging station at the Woods of Wareham or at a motel.



Posted by: Rosebud | Oct 14, 2016 09:44

The electric cars and charging stations are a great idea.  I further support the charging station at the rest stop on I-95.   You want people to stop and notice Wareham, as opposed to just driving by.   The more who stop, the bigger potential for increased business.



Posted by: Rosebud | Oct 14, 2016 09:45

The electric cars and charging stations are a great idea.  I further support the charging station at the rest stop on I-95.   You want people to stop and notice Wareham, as opposed to just driving by.   The more who stop, the bigger potential for increased business.



Posted by: Rosebud | Oct 14, 2016 09:45

The electric cars and charging stations are a great idea.  I further support the charging station at the rest stop on I-95.   You want people to stop and notice Wareham, as opposed to just driving by.   The more who stop, the bigger potential for increased business.



Posted by: Wareham By The Sea | Oct 14, 2016 16:52

Electric cars and charging stations are a great idea for the town and for running around in the town.  What percentage of people traveling up 195 in all-electric cars will be interested in charging their car there?  I say very little.  It takes a while to charge them.  Has that been considered?  The new Chevy Volt for example takes 4.5 Hours.  What is there to do at that rest stop for 4.5 hours? Even if they charged quickly, what percentage of those that stop are going to be interested in cruising around Wareham after they charge up ?  They're just going to go before their battery runs low again.  "All-electric" (not to be confused with hybrid) cars are the type that need to be charged.  They are tiny and barley fit two average sized people.  Aside from the Tesla, "all-electric" cars are commuter vehicles.  Perfect for Town of Wareham employees to run around town in.  But tourists and families looking to spend time patronizing Wareham will not be traveling in an "all-electric" car.  Believe me, I'm not some kind of anti-electric gas guzzler supporter...don't take me wrong.  It's just fact, all-electric cars are not commonly driven too much on interstate highways due to travel range per charge, size, and safety.  I didn't mention safety.  They're tiny death traps that are no match for all other vehicles on the highway.  I wouldn't drive one on 195 and I sure as heck wouldn't pile my family in one. 

 

I say that the other charging station should go at the Main Street Fire Station.  Possibly on the back water side.  There can be designated spots.  Folk can stroll around downtown.  Maybe hop on that summer train for a trip down the cape.                   



Posted by: bob | Oct 17, 2016 12:00

Mr.Sullivan said he wants to sell Wareham,by installing a  charge station out on a rest area,why not sell Wareham by living and working in town, Mr. Sullivan.....



Posted by: Andrea Smith | Oct 17, 2016 16:01

Bob - there are many, many reasons why Town Administrators choose to live in towns other than the one where they serve as an administrator. Among some of the reasons:

 

not wanting to disrupt roots that they have established in the town where they are currently living,

 

wanting/needing to be in close proximity to aging or ill family members

 

not wanting to leave a home the rental or mortgage cost of which they know to be affordable, and having to try to find a new home equally affordable

 

not wanting to go through the disruptive process of leaving a home in which they are happy and comfortable and trying to find a new home that they will give them as much comfort and happiness

 

not wanting to go through the often overwhelming job of packing, moving and unpacking again.

 

Personally I doubt there are many towns that require their town administrators to live in the town. Adding that requirement as a condition of consideration for employment would surely greatly limit the number of applicants interested in the position. Shouldn't the most important consideration when hiring or renewing the contract of a town administrator be having the best possible person for the job, based upon their talents and skills, and not based upon their place of residence?

 

So, now Bob, I ask you...please if you know of towns in Massachusetts which require their town administrators to live in the town where they are serving as administrator, name a few.

 

 



Posted by: Swifts_Sheriff | Oct 17, 2016 18:05

Smitty ..... Many towns make it mandatory for their town Administrators  to live in town .....



Posted by: Janet | Oct 18, 2016 07:02

About the security cameras at the Library...   Why doesn't the Library remove them to keep them from being damaged by the weather?   Does the Library keep them in their budget each year as an expense for repairs or electric costs?  And if so, how much would we save if the removal of them is done?



Posted by: Andrea Smith | Oct 18, 2016 07:04

Swifty - can you name a few of those towns?



Posted by: bob | Oct 18, 2016 21:16

ANDREA,I never said that it should be mandatory for him to live in town,but don't you think other people uproot there families to take jobs or higher paying jobs....And as the banners on Main Street say....LIVE, WORK AND,PLAY IN WAREHAM.........



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